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Content Author:
Date: 25 January 2016

In this video, Dr. Margaret Parker, MD, MCCM, Division Chief of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital; Professor Pediatrics, Anesthesia, and Medicine at the Stony Brook University School of Medicine; and Associate Editor of Critical Care Medicine, will review the

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 18 January 2016

The mechanism of pulse oximetry, at the level of the blood vessels, is animated.

Last reviewed: December 12, 2014.

Content Author:
Date: 6 January 2016

In this video, Dr. George Taylor outlines the approach to evaluating chest radiographs in children with known or suspected heart disease. Dr. Taylor discusses evaluation of the heart, pulmonary vasculature, airway, and situs of the chest and abdomen.
 

Podcast:

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 17 December 2015

Various electrocardiogram waveforms seen with potassium abnormalities.  

Last reviewed: December 17, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 9 December 2015

Animation of a left to right shunt ventricular septal defect occurring in two locations.

Last reviewed: December 9, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 9 December 2015

Anterior view of cardiac cross section demonstrating movement of bicuspid and tricuspid valves. Valve components include, leaflet, chordae tendineae and papillary muscles.

Last reviewed: December 9, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 9 December 2015

Animation of Eisenmenger's Syndrome, showing reversal of a left to right shunt due to increased flow through the pulmonary vasculature (result of a congenital heart defect).

Last reviewed: December 9, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 9 December 2015

Animation of double chamber right ventricle, a defect most commonly seen with membranous VSDs and due to hypertrophy of muscles around the moderator band.

Last reviewed: December 9, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 16 November 2015

Illustration of a subpulmonary or conal ventricular septal defect (VSD), one of the five subcategories of VSDs that rarely closes on its own.

Last reviewed: November 16, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 16 November 2015

Illustration of a muscular ventricular septal defect (VSD), the most common of the five subcategories of VSDs.

Last reviewed: November 16, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 16 November 2015

Illustration of an atrioventricular canal or endocardial cushion ventricular septal defect (VSD), one of the five subcategories of VSDs.

Last reviewed: November 16, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 16 November 2015

Illustration of a (peri)membranous ventricular septal defect (VSD), the second most common of the five subcategories of VSDs.

Last reviewed: November 16, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 6 November 2015

ECG Tracing for defibrillator indicating Ventricular Tachycardia.

 

Last reviewed: November 6, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 6 November 2015

ECG Tracing for defibrillator indicating Ventricular Fibrillation.

Last reviewed: November 6, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 6 November 2015

Palmar/Ventral view of right distal arm, forearm and hand, identifies brachial artery with blood flow.

Last reviewed: November 6, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 14 October 2015

Palmar view of a pediatric manikin's right hand with arterial circulation overlaid.  Healthcare provider occludes radial artery to demonstrate persistent perfusion of hand.

Last reviewed: October 14, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 14 October 2015

Rhythm Strip demonstrating examples of normal QRS, wide QRS and narrow QRS.

Last reviewed: October 14, 2015.

Content Author:
OPENPediatrics Staff
Date: 14 October 2015

Anterior view of the heart with coronary artery anatomy.

Last reviewed: October 14, 2015.

Content Author:
Lisa Mccabe MSN, RN-BC, CCRN, PCNS-BC
Date: 14 October 2015

Learn about the anatomy and physiology of fetal and post-natal circulation.

Initial publication: March 18, 2015.

Most recent peer-review: October 14, 2015.

Podcast:

Listen to the audio track of this video.

Content Author:
Date: 14 October 2015

In this video, Nancy Braudis discusses cardiac anatomy, basic components of an ECG, and intracardiac pressures.

For a PDF summary highlighting the main points of this video, click here